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20
07

La Freccia che Colpisce
il Bersaglio Vola
per Sempre

The idea of center as origin, the place from which infinite directions depart, or the infinitely small vanishing point, is found in the iron scultpure Omphalos,[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]a series of ink drawings with the same title, and La freccia che colpisce il bersaglio vola per sempre, a sculpture in white terracotta whose four parts are, in turn, composed of a series of concentric sub-parts sloping towards the inside to form a sort of visual vortex. Omphalos is a word from ancient Greek meaning “navel,” but also umbilical cord, the center of the Earth. The omphalos is the center of the human body, but it is also, significantly, a scar that bears witness to the moment in which we were separated from the maternal body that hosted and generated us; it is the tangible sign of a separation, but also of the conquest of an independent life.
In La freccia che colpisce il bersaglio vola per sempre the concentric circles attract the eye, sucking the gaze towards an infinitely small inner point, triggering a visual vortex. This tiny point is not conceived as the center or the extremity of the world, just as it was not seen as such in Omphalos. Instead, we can say that it is precisely “this vortex,” “this rotation” in a rhythmical movement of being and non-being, of visible and invisible that belongs to all things, and is seen as the extreme meaning of the world. The relationship between these works emerges, then, as tension, a struggle between two poles: not as laceration, but as the intense intimacy, the mutual belonging of the two rivals.[/read]

La Freccia che Colpisce il Bersaglio Vola per Sempre. Terracotta, 4 elements variable dimensions, 2007 [S0021]

La Freccia che Colpisce il Bersaglio Vola per Sempre. Paper model, 2007 [S0021]

La Freccia che Colpisce il Bersaglio Vola per Sempre. Terracotta, 4 elements variable dimensions, 2007 [S0021]