1988 Elelisphatos

×    

19
88

Elelisphatos

Glancing through the pages of this book is like entering “another space”. This space, “other” than that in which we are and move through, within our dimensions and with our physical weight, is the space within the book.[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]Entering the book means entering the realm of the twelve images. Letting ourselves be carried away by the images, letting ourselves be led by them means entering an extraneous space, thereby undergoing a fundamental conversion with respect to the world and reality.
The book is silent and could not be otherwise: there cannot be extraneous words along with the twelve images, extraneous words that enter their self-sufficient realm, and my words here are quite tightly outside the book, in another place altogether.
Respect the silence of these images means understanding their innermost nature and at the same time observing this condition without respect for which there is no way of reaching them.
The silence of the images does not wholly exclude words: it does, however, only embrace those that are part of the “text” of the image which is a polysemous text par excellence.
The words that appear in the book violate the silence of the blank page from which they seem to emerge, as if by magic: they live apart from the determinative aspect of the discourse and in no away establish it.
The words, here, term things as animal, vegetable or mineral; that is the world, along the guidelines of an obsession for classifying that does not constitute an order.
Taken out of the discourse the words in the book live a rapport of a metonymical nature with the images in a perennial exchange of planes that, at the same time, forms the secret order of the book which, once we have perceived it, allows us to enter the pages and to go through time, grasping the “law” which, arbitrary like in all games, both governs it and builds it up. Part of this game, whose fundamental rule is purposely not made clear by the artist, are the black signs on a white background that cross the page with an almost abrupt movement, a kind of unusual code. The completeness of the text has been lost and, like with an enigma, those glancing through are called upon to recover it by patiently gathering together the indications that refer to it.
There are twelve numbered images in the book: twelve like the months of the year, twelve like the signs of the Zodiac, twelve like the fruits of the tree of life, twelve like the tribes of the people of Israel, twelve like the disciples of Jesus Christ, twelve like the stars that make up the crown of the Lady of the Apocalypse and so on…
In a way these twelve images are related to the Zodiac as a symbol in itself and as a grouping together of individual elements; but the Zodiac here is referred to, more than anything else, as the place of connections where, in an endless flight, something stands in the place of something else: what is important is the continual movement and the liaison between the terrestrial element and the celestial element. It is, however, as if the array of meanings that stern from these images could not, as yet, be complied with; there prevails, always, a kind of irreducible nucleus that brings over the unsoundable character of the image: there is, in fact, an essential difference between the images and the meanings, a difference of nature. Before our eyes, the twelve images unwind across the pages of the book, tending to become pure rhythm: and it is through this rhythm, becoming one sole rhythm, that they build up a presence, rather like an event.
This is the nature of the rapport these images have with time: they take place within time, but through them, within the time which is ours, which belongs to the things of the world, a new sort of time comes forward. And it is right there in this ocurence of what is absolutely outside the world of beings and the things that already exist, it is with this emergence of a time dimension wholly “different” to that in which we live, that we become aware of the presence of the work of art and its taking shape as a breath of wind, a chant that evokes bewilderment and leads us elsewhere.
A trace of light brings out twelve figures from a black velvety backdrop, figures that come from afar, not only from that distance of “tradition”, to which they do indeed refer: here, it is a matter of essential distance, or rather we should say that it is , in effect, this very distance which finds expression through these images.
When speaking about them, the artist says that they are bodies that bear signs, while at the same time being traversed by them, signs of both a “corporal” yet “subtle” topography both an “anatomical atlas” and maps of the other world.
They take form before our eyes, yet they are not actually there.
They “exist”, but they do not belong to our world. They have a bearing, because they resemble something else, something “missing”; and since this resemblance still has weight as it is, but is classified as “different”, these images invoke a “difference” that is ever out of reach.
Their essence is, therefore, to be found right there in this difference, and for this reason, too, they have nothing to do with meaning as implied by the existence of the world. The fascination that emanates from them, and intrigues those looking at them and those who are exposed to them, stems from a perturbation that up-turns a well-structured reality: in just one paradoxical move their effect embraces image and object, the space of impossibility and the world of possibility.
The twelve plates included in this book and the book itself do, however, map out an iter: the nature of this iter is one that never finishes, because the goal is the unreachable. For this reason, perhaps, the twelve images we see here resemble another work the artist is carrying ahead: twelve large glass pillars that rise up from the ground towards the sky; here we find glass instead of paper and transparence instead of opaqueness. So the twelve images have assumed another form along their iter: from being griffiti on a black back-ground they have become bodies marked by the transparence of their contours and by the opaqueness of black, a black inconceivable without thinking of the light that passes through the glass. Here the physical, material element dovetails, in the concreteness of the work, with the celestial element to which the nature the glass alludes because of its being transparent, translucent.
The twelve images in the book are a kind of mobile constellation and have moved on in their pilgrimage to visit other places and have left their mark on other materials. They are, therefore, a fragment of e far wider context which is the artist’s overall œuvre.
In its impossible attempt to correspond to some supreme model that does not assume the form of some already existing object, this work has set out along its iter or rather the work itself consists of this infinite iter which is its continually starting afresh.
Daniela Cristadoro
Trad. Clive Poster[/read]

Elelisphatos. Edition of 12 engravings on linoleum, publisher: Alessandro Bagnati, printer: Giorgio Upiglio, linoleum 60×120 cm – paper 70×215 cm, 12 numbered prints, 9 artist’s trials, 1988 [GR0001]

1988 Elelisphatos

×    

19
88

Elelisphatos

ELELISPHATOS
È il silenzio atemporale, il deserto cromatico, l’inafferrabile sfinge crittografia a captare il movimento arcano e elusivo di Elelisphatos.[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]Come strale di luce proveniente da distanze cosmiche, il tratto affiora e spezza la costanza materica del fino nero e un inseguirsi arbitrario, forse ludico, di tracce e indizi e segni di libertà danza intorno alle dodici Tavole presentate nel libro. Solo a prima vista indomabile e inattendibile, il ritmo di geroglifici e arabeschi in corsa verso un inviolato luogo di corrispondenze, misura l’ordine segreto di questo atlante dell’immagine e della memoria nell’ascendenza prevalente del Mito e delle Costellazioni Celesti. Ed è proprio allo Zodiaco che approda, per ripartire verso altri infiniti, l’orizzonte creativo di Ferruccio Ascari, in un rapsodico ritorno di citazioni all’oggettività, alla materia, alla fisicità del segno espresso e della sua ambiguità interpretativa che chiama in soccorso il significato sonoro/concettuale di parole-simbolo. Nomi di antica pregnanza: amethistus, amagallis, myrtus, peristerion, ibis, lapis… Di moderna certezza.
Scorrere le pagine di questo libro equivale ad entrare in un «altro spazio». Questo spazio «altro» rispetto a quello in cui siamo e scorriamo con le nostre dimensioni e con il nostro peso corporeo è lo spazio del libro.
Entrare nel libro equivale ad entrare nel regno delle 12 immagini. Abbandonarsi alle immagini, farsi guidare da esse significa entrare in uno spazio estraneo operando rispetto al mondo ed alla realtà una conversione fondamentale.
Il libro e silenzioso e non poteva essere diversamente: non ci possono essere parole estranee che accompagnino le 12 immagini, che entrino nel loro regno autosufficiente e quelle di chi scrive, giustamente, sono fuori dal libro in un altro luogo.
Rispettare il silenzio di queste immagini significa comprendere la loro natura intima ed osservate nel contempo quella condizione senza il rispetto della quale ad esse non c’è accesso.
Il silenzio delle immagini non esclude in ogni caso le parole: accoglie tuttavia solo quelle che fanno parte del «testo» dell’immagine stessa che è testo polisemico per antonomasia.
Le parole che compaiono nel libro violano il silenzio della pagina bianca dalla quale, per incanto, sembrano emergere: esse vivono al riparo della luce definitoria del discorso e non lo fondano.
Le parole, qui, nominano le cose – animali, vegetali, minerali, ossia il mondo – secondo una ossessione classificatoria che non costituisce un ordine.
Sciolte dal discorso le parole del libro vivono una relazione di tipo metonimico con le immagini in un perenne scambio di piani che costituisce, nel contempo, l’ordine segreto del libro che, una volta intuito, ci permette di entrare nelle sue pagine e di attraversarle cogliendo la « legge » che, arbitraria come in ogni gioco, lo governa e insieme lo costituisce. Di questo gioco, la cui regola fondativa volutamente non è esplicitata dall’autore, sono parte i segni neri su campo bianco che con un movimento quasi repentino, sorta di singolari crittografie, attraversano la pagina.
L’integrità del testo è andata persa e, come in un enigma, si chiede a chi guarda di riconquistarla attraverso la paziente raccolta di indizi che ad essa alludono.
Dodici sono le immagini numerate presenti nel libro: dodici come i mesi dell’anno, dodici come i mesi dello Zodiaco, dodici come i frutti dell’albero della vita, dodici come le tribù del popolo d’Israele, dodici come i discepoli di Gesù, dodici come le stelle di cui è fatta la corona della donna dell’Apocalisse e così via Allo Zodiaco come simbolo per se stesso e come insieme di simboli particolari, queste dodici immagini sono in qualche modo collegate: ma allo Zodiaco qui ci si riferisce, più che altro, come al luogo delle corrispondenze dove, in una fuga all’infinito, qualcosa sta al posto di qualcos’altro: ciò che importa è il continuo spostamento ed il collegamento tra l’elemento terrestre e quello celeste. È come, tuttaivia, se la rete di significazioni che da esse si diparte non potesse ancora esaurirle; permane sempre, una specie di nucleo irriducibile che ci parla dell’insondabilità dell’immagine: tra le immagini e le significazioni c’è infatti una differenza essenziale, una differenza di natura.
Sotto il nostro sguardo, le dodici immagini si snodano lungo le pagine del libro tendendo a diventare puro ritmo: ed è attraverso il ritmo, divenendo un ritmo unico, che esse si manifestano come una presenza, come un avvenimento.
Questa è la natura della relazione che esse intrattengono col tempo: avvengono nel tempo ma, attraverso di esse, nel tempo che è il nostro, che è quello delle cose del mondo, è un altro tempo che si fa avanti, che avviene.
Ed è Proprio in questo avvenimento di ciò che è assolutamente altro dal mondo degli esseri e delle cose che già esistono, è proprio in questo avvenimento di un tempo che è assolutamente «altro » dal tempo in cui siamo, che noi avvertiamo la presenza dell’opera d’arte ed il suo manifestarsi come un soffio di vento, un canto che produce spaesamento e ci conduce altrove.
Un segno di luce fa emergere da un nero fondo e vellutato dodici figure che vengono da una lontananza che non è solo quella della « tradizione », cui pure fanno riferimento: si tratta di una lontananza essenziale o, meglio, è proprio la lontananza che attraverso di essa parla, trova voce.
Di esse l’autore dice che sono corpi che portano segni, ne sono attraversati, segni di una topografia «corporale » e insieme «sottile», «Atlante anatomico» e insieme mappa dall’altro mondo.
Prendono forma sotto il nostro sguardo eppure non sono qui.
Esse «sono», ma non appartengono al nostro mondo.
Significano in virtù della somiglianza qualcosa d’altro, di «assente»; e poiché la somiglianza significa lo stesso, ma sotto la specie dell’«altro», esse invocano un «altro» sempre inafferrabile.
La loro essenza si trova dunque in questa alterità, ed anche per questo non hanno niente a che fare col senso, col significato così come lo implica l’esistenza del mondo. La fascinazione che da esse promana e cui è soggetto chi le
guarda ed al loro sguardo si espone deriva da una perturbazione che sconvolge una realtà ben strutturata: sguardo che comprende in un unico movimento paradossale l’immagine e l’oggetto, lo spazio dell’impossibilità e il mondo della possibilità.
Le dodici tavole presenti nel libro e il libro stesso tracciano tuttavia un cammino: la natura di questo cammino è di non finire mai poiché la meta è l’inattingibile. Per questo, forse, le dodici immagini che qui vediamo ritornano, sotto la specie della somiglianza, in un’altra opera cui l’artista sta lavorando: dodici grandi stele di cristallo si elevano da terra verso il cielo, in luogo della carta il vetro, in luogo della opacità la trasparenza; le dodici immagini nel loro cammino hanno dunque assunto un’altra forma: graffite sul colore nero sono ora corpi segnati dalla trasparenza dei contorni e dall’opacità del nero, un nero inconcepibile senza pensare alla luce che attraversa il cristallo.
qui l’elemento corporale, materico si coniuga, nella concretezza dell’opera a quello celeste a cui allude la natura del vetro per il suo essere materia pervenuta allo stato di trasparenza, attraversabile dalla luce.
Sorta di costellazione mobile, le dodici immagini del libro si sono spostate, nel loro peregrinare hanno visitato altri luoghi, si sono depositate su altri materiali. Esse sono dunque frammento di un testo più ampio che è l’opera stessa dell’artista nel suo complesso.
Nel suo impossibile tentativo di coincidere con qualche supremo modello che non ha luogo come alcun oggetto esistente, l’opera è in cammino o meglio l’opera consiste in questo infinito cammino che è il suo continuo ricominciare.
Daniela Cristadoro[/read]

Elelisphatos. Edizione di 12 incisioni su linoleum, editore: Alessandro Bagnati, stampatore: Giorgio Upiglio, linoleum 60×120 cm – carta 70×215 cm, 12 stampe numerate, 9 prove d’artista, 1988 [GR0001]