2015 Related Video: Vibractions 1978-2012

×    

20
15

Vibractions
1978-2012

[Video]

Combining recent and archive footage, this video presents two different versions of Vibractions, installation/performance from 1978 presented in a new version in 2012 at Casa Anatta, Monte Verità,[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]on the occasion of a solo show of the artist at the Museum of Modern Art in Ascona.
In Vibractions, installation/performance presented for the first time in Milan in February 1978, the visual and sound elements were closely connected within the conceptual framework of a reflection upon the categories of time and space. The paradoxical aim of Vibractions was to measure the architectural space by means of sound, or rather to find a sound equivalent of the architectural space. Site-specific and ongoing, Vibractions was presented in different locations through the years, reaching different results every time based on the peculiar features of each venue. Therefore, the video spans a period of time from 1978 to 2012, combining recent and archive footage in a way that conveys the passing of time while at the same time reaffirming the conceptual vitality of the work.[/read]

Related Video: Vibractions 1978-2012. 06’34”, 2015

2012 Casa Anatta

×    

20
12

Casa Anatta
[Not Self]

In 2012, in the interiors of Casa Anatta, a unique house in Monte Verità, Switzerland, with inner walls entirely covered in wood, Ferruccio Ascari presented a new version of Vibractions, a sound installation first created in 1978.[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]Much like in the original version, harmonic strings were stretched from one side of the rooms to another, so that the inner space of the house became a musical instrument itself “played” by the artist. These four videos document the performance, held in 2012 in the house’s four room, in the form of a video-installation.
Anatta (“Not I” in Pali language) is the name of a unique house built in 1904 in Monte Verità, Switzerland. This was the main venue of the artistic, philosophical and spiritural movement which took place in Monte Verità from early to mid twentieth century.
Consistently with the artist’s typical creation process, the sound and visual material documenting the performance are the starting point of the video-installation Anatta (Non Io). The installation is composed of four videos reproducing as many rooms that give onto the central salon of the house. Every room, with harmonic strings running from one side to another, is transformed into a speaker box, a musical instrument “played” by the artist. The peculiar volumes of each room, entirely covered in wood, result into different resonances. Much like in the original installation from 1978, and the most recent version from 2012, the sound is literally generated by the environment, while the severe black and white images show a space that was closed for many years, suspended in time.[/read]

Casa Anatta [Non Io].Videoinstallation, 4 movies/4 different walls, 17’17”, Monte Verità, 2012 [PE0018]
Casa Anatta [Non Io]. Sound installation/performance, Monte Verità, 2012 [PE0018]

Performance’s score

1978 Vibractions

×    

19
78

Vibractions

In february 1979 an experimental center for visual arts called Sixto/Notes opened in Milan, and precisely in a street called S. Sisto. The purpose of its founders[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]—Ferruccio Ascari, Luisa Cividin, Daniela Cristadoro, and Roberto Taroini—was to follow two lines at once: the creation of an archive of film documents, and the production of an exhibition program of installations and performances able to express the artistic climate in Italy, Europe and United States at that time.
The main focus of the center was on experiences characterized by an intercontamination of languages aimed at re-defining the field of art, its boundaries and trends. This is the context in which “Untitled,” a sound installation and performance by Ferruccio Ascari, would be read: this work was conceived and created within a program of sound installations organized by the center, which included site-specific works by Lanfranco Baldi, Cioni Carpi, Giuseppe Chiari, John Duncan, Walter Marchetti, Gianni Emilio Simonetti, and Roberto Taroni, along with contributions by representatives of the most radical researches of those years: Ant Farm, BDR Ensemble, Nancy Buchanan, Chris Burden, Dal Bosco-Varesco, Guy de Contet, Douglas Huebler, Layurel Klick, Laymen Stifled, Paul Mc Carthy, Fredrick Nilsen, Barbara Smith, and Demetrio Stratos.
“Untitled” was an emblematic example of a research common at that time in which visual and sound elements were considered as indissolubly bound together, in an analysis which started from a deep reflection upon the categories of time and space in art. The paradoxical purpose of “Untitled” was to measure the architectural space by the use of sound, or even better, to find a sound equivalent of the architectural space; to walk through it in order to catch its specific volumetric, dimensional, visual, and acoustic qualities; to find the law by which it was governed and to establish a relation with the subject walking through it; and finally, to find a way of making the space respond to sound impulses until its own Sound was discovered, “the uniqueness and unrepeatability of its resounding in relation to what occurs within it”—as Ferruccio Ascari wrote in a presentation text of this work.
“Untitled” was subsequently reproposed in different sites, the eighteenth-century chapel of the University College of Pavia (1979) and the theatre Aut/Off in Milan (1980): on these occasions, the work was presented under the new titles of “Vibractions I” and “Vibractions II” and produced very different results not only at a sound level. The spatial qualities of each place (dimensions, volumes, architectural typology) were reproduced by a network of harmonic strings running through the floor, the walls, and the ceiling of the room: the strings were anchored at their ends to metal frustums of cones which served as resonance boxes. The sound equipment–designed and realized following mathematical proportions deduced by the environment’s volumetric ratios—became the instrument used to investigate the acoustic specificity of each space, to seize its innermost identity, or, in Ascari’s words, to “find out its own sound” and therefore to disclose its essence. The “epiphany” was committed to the moment of the performance, during which the environment/instrument was “played” by a variable number of instrumentalists/agents: by the use of plectrums, violin bows, and hammers, all of them made the harmonic strings vibrate according to a score that was also mathematically deduced by the volumetric ratios of the space.
Drops of water fell regularly from a cruet hanging from the ceiling onto a large iron disc anchored to a tripod: their sound, amplified through a microphone, punctuated the duration of the event. A looped video reproducing the environment while walked through by the agents/instrumentalists was projected onto the environment itself: the projector placed on a rotating base followed optically the path of the instrumentalists.
“Untitled” was composed of three interconnected levels—installation, performance and film. In the installation, the harmonic strings running throughout the walls were conceptually determined as “visible” sounds even before they were put in vibration. In the performance, the action exercised on the strings was an act of “dis/in/canto,” an Italian word which etymologically means exactly “something producing vibrations”: by resounding and lowering, the vibrations originated kind of an immaterial motion in the space and turned into “acoustic images,” while the environment became an instrument entirely run through by harmonic strings.
The video reproducing the environment and projected onto the environment itself gave shape to a sort of visual whirl, where projection and action became indefinitely knotted and untied, in a continuous relationship of illusion/disillusion.
Of this work, so conceptually and visually tied to the radical investigations of that time, only part of the equipment is left, along with a few meagre notes, a certain number of pictures, and a sound recording.
More than thirty years later, in 2012, Ferruccio Ascari will refer to this 1978 work in a recent series of environmental installations among which Vibractions 2012 and Casa Anatta [Non Io].[/read]

“Audio Works” Poster, Sixto notes, Milano, 1978

Vibractions II, installazione sonora, performance, Teatro OutOff, Milano, 1980 [PE0001]

Vibractions I, sound installation, performance, Chapel of the University College Cairoli, Pavia, 1979

Untitled, sound installation, performance, Sixto Notes, Milano 1978

Sketches

Project clipboard

Related Video: Vibractions 1978-2012. 06’34”, 2015

2012 Casa Anatta

×    

20
12

Casa Anatta
[Non Io]

Nel 2012 Ferruccio Ascari riprende, nelle stanze di Casa Anatta a Monte Verità, Vibractions, una sua installazione sonora del 1978.[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]Come avveniva in questo suo lavoro degli anni ’70 anche qui vengono tese da parete a parete delle corde armoniche e la casa – al suo interno interamente in legno – diviene un anomalo strumento musicale ‘suonato’ dall’artista. Questi quattro video costituiscono un progetto che riproduce nella virtualità della video-installazione la performance realizzata nel 2012 nelle quattro stanze di Casa Anatta.
Anatta (“Non Io” in lingua Pali) è il nome di una casa ‘speciale’ edificata nel 1904 a Monte Verità in Svizzera. Speciale perché è stata il fulcro delle esperienze artistiche, filosofiche e spirituali che si sono svolte a Monte Verità a partire dai primi anni del ‘900, dando vita ad una straordinaria stagione culturale proseguita sino alla metà del secolo scorso.
Secondo una processualità germinativa tipica del lavoro dell’artista, il materiale sonoro e visivo prodotto in quell’occasione è all’origine di Anatta [Non Io], un progetto di video-installazione sonora. La video-installazione è costituita da quattro video che riproducono i quattro ambienti della casa che si affacciano sulla sala centrale. Al soffitto è appesa una gabbia con due uccelli. Ciascuna stanza, percorsa da corde vibranti, si trasforma in una cassa armonica, un anomalo strumento musicale che viene ‘suonato’ dall’artista. Le specifiche caratteristiche volumetriche delle quattro stanze interamente rivestite di legno, la loro diversa risonanza, sono all’origine di un flusso sonoro ininterrotto. Come accadeva nella installazione del ’78, e in quella più recente del 2012, le sonorità sono letteralmente generate dallo spazio, ma ulteriori elementi si insinuano nella trama di questa video-installazione. La qualità del suono si coniuga con la severità essenziale delle immagini in bianco e nero: l’intreccio tra questi due piani riporta in vita un luogo rimasto chiuso per anni che appare come sospeso nel tempo e sembra suggerirne, attraverso una molteplicità di indizi, di stratificazioni di senso, l’essenza segreta.[/read]

Casa Anatta [Non Io]. Videoinstallazione, 4 canali, 17’17”, Monte Verità, 2012 [PE0018]
Casa Anatta [Non Io]. Installazione sonora/performance, Monte Verità, 2012 [PE0018]

Partitura per la performance

2015 Related Video: Vibractions 1978-2012

×    

20
15

Vibractions
1978-2012

[Video]

Attraverso materiali recenti e d’archivio il video ripercorre due diverse versioni di Vibractions, installazione-performance del 1978 riproposta in una nuova versione nel 2012 a Casa Anatta, presso Monte Verità,[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]in occasione di una personale dell’artista nel Museo d’Arte Moderna di Ascona.
Vibractions, installazione-performance presentata per la prima volta a Milano nel febbraio del ‘78, vedeva indissolubilmente congiunti elementi visivi e materiali sonori, in un percorso analitico che partiva da una riflessione sulle categorie di spazio e di tempo. Paradossale assunto di fondo era quello di ‘misurare’ lo spazio architettonico attraverso il suono o, meglio, di trovare un suo equivalente sul piano sonoro. Work in progress, site specific, Vibractions è stata nel tempo riproposta in luoghi diversi, con esiti ogni volta differenti in relazione alle specifiche caratteristiche dello spazio. Il video copre un arco temporale che va dal 1978 al 2012 attraverso materiali d’archivio e di recente produzione che restituiscono il clima del tempo, il suo trascorrere, ma anche la vitalità dell’assunto di fondo di un’opera capace ogni volta si rigenerarsi in relazione al luogo che la ospita.[/read]

Video correlato: Vibractions 1978-2012. 06’34”, 2015

1978 Vibractions

×    

19
78

Vibractions

Nel febbraio del 1978 si apre a Milano, in via S. Sisto 6, Sixto/Notes, centro sperimentale di arti visive. Intento dei fondatori -Ferruccio Ascari, Luisa Cividin, Daniela Cristadoro, Roberto Taroni-[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]era quello di operare lungo due linee direttrici: la costituzione di un archivio di documentazione di films e video d’artista e la realizzazione di rassegne di installazioni e performances che rendessero conto del clima di ricerca di quegli anni in Italia, in Europa e negli Stati Uniti. L’interesse del centro era rivolto principalmente ad esperienze che si muovevano all’interno della contaminazione e dello sconfinamento dei vari linguaggi coll’intento di ridefinire il territorio dell’arte, i suoi confini, individuandone le linee di tendenza.
E’ in questo contesto che si situa “Untitled” , installazione sonora/performance di Ferruccio Ascari, ideata e realizzata nell’ambito di una rassegna di installazioni sonore che presentava in anteprima lavori site-specific di Lanfranco Baldi, Cioni Carpi, Giuseppe Chiari, John Dancan, Walter Marchetti, Gianni Emilio Simonetti, Roberto Taroni, insieme a materiali sonori di estrema attualità relativi al lavoro di alcuni rappresentanti della ricerca artistica più radicale di quegli anni: Ant Farm, BDR Ensemble, Nancy Buchanan, Chris Burden, Dal Bosco-Varesco, Guy de Contet, Douglas Huebler, Layurel Klick, Laymen Stifled, Paul Mc Carthy, Fredrick Nilsen, Barbara Smith, Demetrio Stratos. “Untitled”, l’installazione sonora di Ferruccio Ascari era, in tale contesto, un esempio emblematico di un filone di ricerca, tipico di quegli anni, che vedeva indissolubilmente congiunti elementi visivi e materiali sonori, in un percorso analitico che partiva da una riflessione sulle categorie di spazio e di tempo all’interno dell’arte.
Paradossale assunto di fondo di “ Untitled” era quello di misurare lo spazio attraverso ilsuono, o meglio, di trovare un suo equivalente sul piano sonoro.” Percorrerlo, coglierne le specifiche qualità volumetriche, dimensionali, visive, acustiche; misurarlo con il metro del tempo, trovare una legge che lo governi e stabilisca una relazione con il soggetto che l’attraversa; farlo rispondere a sollecitazioni sonore per scoprire il suo “Suono”, l’unicità e l’irripetibilità del suo risuonare in rapporto a cio che in esso accade” : così Ferruccio Ascari, in uno scritto di presentazione di questo suo lavoro. “ Untitled” venne successivamente riproposta col titolo di Vibractions I e Vibractions II ed esiti, non solo sonori, ogni volta differenti in due diversi luoghi: la settecentesca Cappella del Collegio Universitario Cairoli, a Pavia nel ’79 , il teatro Aut/Off di Milano nell’80.
I rapporti spaziali qualificanti il luogo in cui di volta in volta l’installazione si situava /tipologia architettonica/volumi/ dimensioni/ venivano letteralmente ri-prodotti, ri-presentati attraverso un reticolo di corde armoniche che percorrevano l’ambiente lungo il pavimento, le pareti, il soffitto. Le corde armoniche, erano ancorate ai due estremi a tronchi di cono metallici che fungevano da cassa di risonanza. Il ‘materiale sonoro’ – progettato e realizzato secondo proporzioni matematiche ricavate dai rapporti volumetrici dell’ambiente – diveniva in tal modo lo strumento con cui indagare la specificità acustica dello spazio, coglierne l’identità più riposta, ‘ scoprirne il suono’, come diceva Ascari, ossia rivelarne l’anima. Il momento della ‘rivelazione’ era affidato alla performance, durante la quale l’ambiente/strumento veniva ‘suonato’ da un numero sempre variabile – in relazione allo spazio dato – di strumentisti/attanti: ciascuno dei quali con plettri, archetti di violino, martelletti, metteva in vibrazione le corde armoniche, eseguendo una partitura anch’essa desunta – attraverso proporzioni matematiche – dai rapporti volumetrici informanti lo spazio.
Da un’ampolla collocata sul soffitto gocce d’acqua cadevano con regolarità su di un grande disco di metallo ancorato tramite molle ad un treppiede : il loro suono, amplificato attraverso un microfono scandiva il tempo dell’evento, la sua durata. Un filmato a loop riproducente l’ambiente nella sua perimetralità mentre veniva percorso dagli attanti/strumentisti, veniva proiettato sull’ambiente stesso: il proiettore posto su di una base rotante ripercorreva otticamente il tracciato percorso dagli strumentisti medesimi. Untitled si costituiva pertanto su tre piani in stretta relazione: l’installazione, la performance, il filmato.
Nell’installazione le corde armoniche che percorrevano le pareti secondo una scansione spaziale determinata matematicamente, tendevano a farsi suoni ”visibili”
concettualmente, ancor prima o comunque al di là dell’essere fatte vibrare.
Nella performance l’azione esercitata sulle corde era atto di “ dis/in/canto, nel senso primo della parola, che produce vibrazioni appunto. Le vibrazioni nel loro risuonare e smorzarsi creavano nello spazio una sorta di movimento immateriale, tendevano a diventare immagini “acustiche”. L’intero ambiente diveniva dunque uno strumento percorso da corde armoniche.
Il filmato riproducente l’ambiente nella sua perimetralità, riproiettato sull’ambiente stesso, dava luogo ad una sorta di vortice visivo: la proiezione e l’azione si andavano indefinitamente annodando e sciogliendo in un rapporto di illusione/delusione.
Di questo lavoro, concettualmente e visivamente legato al clima di ricerca radicale di quegli anni sono rimasti alcuni materiali di lavoro, qualche scarno appunto, alcune foto e una registrazione sonora realizzata nella settecentesca Cappella del Collegio Universitario Cairoli, a Pavia, che ospitò nel 1979 una seconda versione di questo lavoro col titolo di Vibractions.
A più di trent’anni di distanza, nel 2012, Ferruccio Ascari riprenderà questo lavoro in una serie di installazioni ambientali tra cui Vibractions 2012 e Casa Anatta [Non Io][/read]

Manifesto “Audio Works”, Sixto notes, Milano, 1978

Vibractions II, installazione sonora, performance, Teatro OutOff, Milano, 1980 [PE0001]

Vibractions I, installazione sonora, performance, Cappella del Collegio Universitario Cairoli, Pavia, 1979

Untitled, installazione sonora, performance, Sixto Notes, Milano 1978

Disegni preparatori

Appunti di progetto

Video correlato: Vibractions 1978-2012. 06’34”, 2015