2017 Ex Voto

×    

20
17

Ex voto

Ex-voto 1, Ex-voto 2, Ex-voto 3, the three works located in the church of San Bernardino alle Ossa in the context of the personal exhibition of Ferruccio Ascari “Silenzio”, recall the authentic ex-voto offerings covering the walls in front of the ossuary. Here, the intentional choice of the artist has been to integrate these “soft voiced” works in continuity with this “special” place.[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]This also permitted to avoid any overlap with the mood coming from this place. The three works intertwine a dialogue with the authentic ex-votos, thus suggesting to think about the likeness, but also on the difference, between the two: apart from a certain formal reference with those artifacts, which don’t pretend to be anything else than signs of devotion for some received blessing, these three works are situated in a different horizon, that of art as an interrogation, as the search for a sense and also as creation of a space further than that of the daily existence.[/read]

Ex Voto I. Perforated alcantara paper, approx. 40×48 cm, 2017 
Ex Voto II. Plate of perforated graphite, 
approx. 17×28 cm, 2017 
Ex Voto III. Foil of perforated rubber, 
approx. 38×58 cm, 2017 

Ex Voto I. Carta alcantara traforata, circa 40x48 cm, 2017 Ex Voto II. Lastra di grafite traforata, circa 17x28 cm, 2017 Ex Voto III. Lamina di gomma traforata, circa 38x58 cm, 2017

2003 Cuori (Ex Voto) III

×    

20
03

Cuori
(Ex Voto) III

Cuori (Ex Voto). Curcuma on paper, 50×70 cm, 2003 [DG0052]

Cuori (Ex Voto). Curcuma on paper, 50×70 cm, 2003 [DG0053]

Cuori (Ex Voto). Curcuma on paper, 35×50 cm, 2003 [DG0054]

Cuori (Ex Voto). Curcuma on paper, 35×50 cm, 2003 [DG0055]

Cuori (Ex Voto). Curcuma on paper, 50×70 cm, 2003 [DG0026]

2001 L’ordine dura un istante III

×    

20
01

L’Ordine Dura
Un Istante III

L’Ordine Dura Un Istante. Perforated paper, detail, 2001 [TR0006]

L’Ordine Dura Un Istante. Perforated paper, 280×140 cm, 2001 [TR0001]

L’Ordine Dura Un Istante. Perforated paper, 280×140 cm, 2001 [TR0019]

L’Ordine Dura Un Istante. Perforated paper, 280×100 cm, 2001 [TR0020]

L’Ordine Dura Un Istante. Perforated paper, 280×100 cm, 2001 [TR0021]

L’Ordine Dura Un Istante. Perforated paper, 280×100 cm, 2001 [TR0022]

2012 Corpi Celesti II

×    

20
12

Corpi
Celesti II

It is interesting to observe how certain questions addressed by Ascari’s work resurface, perhaps after many years, almost to resume a discussion that has not been interrupted[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]but has simply flowed underground, then returning and taking on new forms. This is what happens, for example, in the cycle of works under the title Corpi celesti (Heavenly Bodies), including a series of works on paper from 2006 and an installation in 2012. The same can be said for the reprise of a sound installation from 1978, Vibractions, now shown in a new version that maintains the conceptual approach of the original. The cycle Corpi celesti arises from a question – regarding the force that holds things together or repels them – that is the conceptual nucleus of many other works by the artist. A question that stays open, taking on different configurations each time, reinterpreted through different languages and different materials. In the works on paper in lampblack or curcuma, an invisible centrifugal force subtracts weight from the bodies that wander in the empty space of the sheets. Once again, the void is a latent space rendered “active” by what crosses it, a generative factor on both the temporal and the spatial planes.[/read]

Corpi Celesti. Curcuma on paper, 9 sheets 35×50 cm each, 2006-2012 [DG0028 a-i]

2009 respiro

×    

20
09

Respiro

The sculptures and installations of this period are joined by works on paper, often large in size: while focusing on questions that cross the entire artist’s oeuvre,[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]certain of these works offer us a chance for perhaps a closer approach to his personal sphere, almost to his physical being. We might talk about a proximity that is exposed to the gaze, in a cycle of works on paper under a single title: Respiro (Breath). The large sheets of paper lined up in overlaid rows are crossed by bundles of sinuous lines that flee to the margins. The observer is attracted by their slenderness and, at the same time, their evidence, deceptively like filaments, or hairs embedded in applied onto the paper. The sign is actually obtained with ink, but – as the artist explains – the result is possible only through particular physical and mental preparation: “To obtain this sign, it takes a gesture done with a special brush, with long bristles, dipped in ink. The ink held by the bristles is deposited with a wide, flowing, continuous gesture. Breathing is important: the exhalation accompanies the whole trajectory of the sign on the paper, and the air contained in the lungs is released in synchrony with the release of the ink from the bristles. The lines that cross the sheet have their own shape. Those modulations can be compared to the signs made by a seismograph: the point of the brush records an inner state, just at the tip of the seismograph records telluric movements, or the encephalogram records brain activity.” It is breathing, then, its rhythm, that determines the fluid movement of the lines that cross the paper.[/read]

Respiro. Ink on paper, 6 sheets 66×101 cm each, 2009 [D0391]

Respiro. Ink on paper, 6 sheets 66×101 cm each, 2009 [D0392]

Respiro. Ink on paper, 6 sheets 66×101 cm each, 2009 [D0393]

2007 Pittura per Ciechi

×    

20
07

Pittura
per Ciechi

In the works on paper from this period, with a dizzying shift of perspective, the artist’s gaze is directed into a compositional plot that tends to erase distance,[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]in a near mingling, as if to fully know its innermost structure. But this is not just a case of “learning to see” things as they are intertwined in the plot of nature; it means feeling a sense of belonging to that same plot. This is what happens in Pittura per ciechi (Painting For the Blind), a series di gouaches made on the pages of old Natural History textbooks in Braille, or in works like Bianco/Nero (White/Black) Bianco/Rosso (White/Red), where the shortening of the distance between the eye and the represented object produces effects of distortion, overlaps of figures that appear on the single sheets, disrupting their order: each of them thus appears as a fragment of something whose overall view has been lost.[/read]

Pittura per Ciechi. Gouache on Braille paper, 24 sheets 25×33,5 cm each, 2007 [DG0078]

Pittura per Ciechi. Gouache on Braille paper, 9 sheets 25×33,5 cm each, 2007 [DG0079]

2006 Omphalos – disegni

×    

20
06

Omphalos I

The idea of center as origin, the place from which infinite directions depart, or the infinitely small vanishing point, is found in the iron scultpure Omphalos,[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]a series of ink drawings with the same title, and La freccia che colpisce il bersaglio vola per sempre, a sculpture in white terracotta whose four parts are, in turn, composed of a series of concentric sub-parts sloping towards the inside to form a sort of visual vortex. Omphalos is a word from ancient Greek meaning “navel,” but also umbilical cord, the center of the Earth. The omphalos is the center of the human body, but it is also, significantly, a scar that bears witness to the moment in which we were separated from the maternal body that hosted and generated us; it is the tangible sign of a separation, but also of the conquest of an independent life. The reference to the many meanings of this word emerges in two sculptures, one in iron and one in graphite, and their related drawings. In the sculptures the movement of expansion that starts at the center necessarily encounters a limit at the borders of the object, while in the drawings the lines that spread out from the center suggest a potentially infinite movement. Again in these works, it is not so much the natural, the living that is shown and represented. As the artist remarks in his writing, instead it is a question of “to act as nature would, which is also typical of the alchemical process. The alchemist is he who sets out not to reproduce a natural phenomenon in the laboratory, but to pro-duce processes of transmutation according to the ways of nature, attuning soul and body to its way of proceeding”.[/read]

Omphalos. Ink on paper, 2 sheets 66×102 cm each, 2006/2007 [D0042]

Omphalos. Ink on paper, 2 sheets 66×102 cm each, 2006/2007 [D0047]

Omphalos. Ink on braille paper, 51×34 cm, 2006/2007 [D0122]

Omphalos. Ink on braille paper, 51×34 cm, 2006/2007 [D0123]

Omphalos. Ink on paper, 3 sheets 66×102 cm each, 2006/2007 [D0039]

Omphalos. Ink on paper, 2 sheets 66×102 cm each, 2006/2007 [D0040]

2007 apparente – BiancoNero

×    

20
07

Bianco/Nero

In the works on paper from this period, with a dizzying shift of perspective, the artist’s gaze is directed into a compositional plot that tends to erase distance,[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]in a near mingling, as if to fully know its innermost structure. But this is not just a case of “learning to see” things as they are intertwined in the plot of nature; it means feeling a sense of belonging to that same plot. This is what happens in Pittura per ciechi (Painting For the Blind), a series di gouaches made on the pages of old Natural History textbooks in Braille, or in works like Bianco/Nero (White/Black) Bianco/Rosso (White/Red), where the shortening of the distance between the eye and the represented object produces effects of distortion, overlaps of figures that appear on the single sheets, disrupting their order: each of them thus appears as a fragment of something whose overall view has been lost.[/read]

Bianco/Nero. Gouache on paper, 36 sheets 25×35 cm each, 2007 [DG0047]

Bianco/Nero. Gouache on paper, 36 sheets 25×35 cm each, 2007 [DG0046]

Bianco/Nero. Gouache on paper, detail, 2007 [DG0046]

Bianco/Nero. Gouache on paper, 12 sheets 25×35 cm each, 2007 [DG0058]

Bianco/Nero. Gouache on paper, 3 sheets 25×35 cm each, 2007 [DG0050]

Bianco/Nero. Gouache on paper, 3 sheets 25×35 cm each, 2007 [DG0051]

2007 apparente – BiancoRosso

×    

20
07

Bianco/Rosso

In the works on paper from this period, with a dizzying shift of perspective, the artist’s gaze is directed into a compositional plot that tends to erase distance,[read more=”Read More”less=”Read Less”]in a near mingling, as if to fully know its innermost structure. But this is not just a case of “learning to see” things as they are intertwined in the plot of nature; it means feeling a sense of belonging to that same plot. This is what happens in Pittura per ciechi (Painting For the Blind), a series di gouaches made on the pages of old Natural History textbooks in Braille, or in works like Bianco/Nero (White/Black) Bianco/Rosso (White/Red), where the shortening of the distance between the eye and the represented object produces effects of distortion, overlaps of figures that appear on the single sheets, disrupting their order: each of them thus appears as a fragment of something whose overall view has been lost.[/read]

Bianco/Rosso. Gouache on paper, 36 sheets 25×35 cm each, 2007 [DG0049]

Bianco/Rosso. Gouache on paper, 36 sheets 25×35 cm each, 2007 [DG0048]

Bianco/Rosso. Gouache on paper, detail, 2007 [DG0048]